Research Projects


In order to strengthen your profile so to have better opportunities in your career, i. e, for jobs or for higher studies you need to have good publications under your belt. The only program since 2010 which is fulfilling this need is the Research Project Training Program of BDG LifeSciences (OPC) Pvt. Ltd. which is of novel research projects on the latest technologies of Bioinformatics. 

In this program, we implement the current research trend and apply unique ways of teaching plus practical application so to make you learn in the best possible way. As it is done online hence participants have the freedom of choosing the time of training sessions according to their choice and also save a huge amount of money in travel, accommodation, food, etc., As of now we have completed more than 60 research projects and all of them published at International level. This research project can be done as a Major and/or thesis project for the final year or if someone wants to strengthen their profile. You can view all the completed projects hereTo view the video feedback of our previous events kindly visit our YouTube Channel To view, the teams for current projects click here


CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECT

Our research project training program is of novel research projects on the latest technologies of Bioinformatics. In this program, we implement the current research trend and apply unique ways of teaching plus practical application so to make you learn in the best possible way. As it is done online hence participants have the freedom of choosing the time of training sessions according to their choice and also save a huge amount of money in travel, accommodation, food, etc., As of now we have completed more than 70 research projects and all of them published at International level. This research project can be done as a Major and/or thesis project for the final year or if someone wants to strengthen their profile so as to have better opportunities in their career, i. e, for jobs or for higher studies. Applications are invited for 5 SEATS in our 73 novel research project entitled " Inhibitory study of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK): A Virtual screening, Molecular Docking & ADMET study for  combating cancer"

DURATION: 3-5 Months- training sessions will be conducted online according to the date and time you choose. The sessions will be conducted as CHAT so that you can use it for reference for later use.

FEE: In India Online: 24500 INR, Foreign Online: $ 480 (USD)

OBJECTIVE

To elucidate the structural properties and binding mode of derivatives of Germine, Cyclopamine, Jervine & Veramiline extracts from the Rhizomes of Veratrum dahuricum showing antitumor activity (Jian Tang et al, Phytother. Res. 22, 1093–1096 (2008). Molecular modeling approach with a focus of Structure based drug designing will be applied to a set of 1000 derivatives of Germine, Cyclopamine, Jervine & Veramiline which might selectively inhibit the kinase.

The study will provide a framework for the design of compounds with potential therapeutic applications and hint for the future design of new derivatives with higher potency and specificity.

INTRODUCTION

Protein kinases are important drug targets in human cancers, inflammation, and metabolic diseases [1]. Human protein kinases are attractive targets for the development of new therapeutics because of their involvement in processes associated with the progression of cancers and metabolic diseases [2, 3]. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a tyrosine kinase that functions as a key molecule of signals leading to invasion and metastasis [4].

It is known that FAK is activated from integrin and growth factor receptors by auto-phosphorylation followed by subsequent activation of other functional phosphorylation sites to advance the signals to downstream pathways, such as AKT [5, 6]. Based on these facts, FAK is thought to play a critical role in malignant behavior including proliferation, survival, and invasion [7, 8]. FAK is overexpressed in many tumors, including those derived from the head and neck, colon, breast, prostate, liver, and thyroid [9, 10, 11, 12].

Furthermore, FAK overexpression is highly correlated with an invasive phenotype in these tumors. Inhibition of FAK signaling by overexpression of dominant-negative fragments of FAK reduces invasion of glioblastomas [13] and ovarian cancer cells [14]. FAK therefore represents an important target for the development of anti-neoplastic and anti-metastatic drugs.

Veratrum dahuricum (Liliaceae), occurring in the northeast of China, is one of the 14 species of the genus Veratrum in China (Editorial Board of Flora of China of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1980; Editorial Board of Zhong Hua Ben Cao, 1999). The rhizomes of some Veratrum species including V. dahuricum, known as Lilu in Chinese traditional medicine, are used for some diseases such as apoplexy, epilepsy and acariasis (Editorial Board of Zhong Hua Ben Cao, 1999). The crude extracts and compounds isolated from Veratrum plant have been reported to possess various pharmacological activities, including hypotensive, antithrombotic and antitumor functions (Xu et al., 2001). So it was of interest to study the antitumor activity of the alkaloids from this plant.

MATERIAL & METHODS

Protein selection/enzyme preparation:

FAK play a critical role in the biological processes of cancer cells, so FAK has been proposed as a potential target in cancer therapy and small molecule inhibitors for use as potential cancer therapies.

We have taken the structure from Protein Data Bank title Focal Adhesion Kinase catalytic domain in complex with bis-anilino pyrimidine inhibitor., PDB ID=2JKO [15].

To study the binding mode of ligand, the active site of the protein has to be found out which will be done by literature review as well as software. Combining a novel algorithm for rapid binding site identification and evaluation with easy-to-use property visualization tools, the software will provide with an efficient means to find and better exploit the characteristics of ligand binding sites.

Substrate selection:

Derivatives of Germine, Cyclopamine, Jervine & Veramiline will be chosen from different Chemical Databases on the basis of:

  • Structure similarity
  • Substructure Search
  • Isomers
  • Conformers

They’ll be drawn using ChemSketch[16] from Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. and converted by Open Babel: The Open Source Chemistry Toolbox[17] so to start the in-silico work. The work comes under in-silico generation of ligands. To repair distorted geometries by moving atoms Energy Minimization will be done by Swiss PDB Viewer [18] to release internal constraints.

Docking setup:

In the field of molecular modeling, docking is a method which predicts the preferred orientation of one molecule to a second when bound to each other to form a stable complex [19].

Knowledge of the preferred orientation in turn may be used to predict the strength of association or binding affinity between two molecules using for example scoring functions.

Docking is frequently used to predict the binding orientation of small molecule drug candidates to their protein targets in order to in turn predict the affinity and activity of the small molecule. Hence docking plays an important role in the rational design of drugs [20].

Molecular docking can be thought of as a problem of “lock-and-key”, where one is interested in finding the correct relative orientation of the “key” which will open up the “lock” (where on the surface of the lock is the key hole, which direction to turn the key after it is inserted, etc.). Here, the protein can be thought of as the “lock” and the ligand can be thought of as a “key”. Molecular docking may be defined as an optimization problem, which would describe the “best-fit” orientation of a ligand that binds to a particular protein of interest. However, since both the ligand and the protein are flexible, a “hand-in-glove” analogy is more appropriate than “lock-and-key”.[21] During the course of the process, the ligand and the protein adjust their conformation to achieve an overall “best-fit” and this kind of conformational adjustments resulting in the overall binding is referred to as “induced-fit” [22].

Two approaches are particularly popular within the molecular docking community. One approach uses a matching technique that describes the protein and the ligand as complementary surfaces [23, 24]. The second approach simulates the actual docking process in which the ligand-protein pairwise interaction energies are calculated [25].

Docking will be performed where energy evaluation will be combined through grids of affinity potential employing various search algorithms to find the suitable binding position for a ligand on a given protein. While docking, polar hydrogen’s will be added to the ligands. Docking of HER2 to these molecules will be carried out using LGA[26] with standard docking protocol on the basis a population size of 150 randomly placed individuals; a maximum number of 2.5 *107 energy evaluations, a mutation rate of 0.02, a crossover rate of 0.80 and an elitism value of 1. Ten independent docking runs will be carried out for each ligand and results will be clustered according to the 1.0 Angstroms rmsd criteria. The grid maps representing the proteins will be calculated using auto grid and grid size was set to 60*60*60 points with grid spacing of 0.375 Angstroms.

The coordinate of the docked protein along with the ligand will visualize using software within 6.5 Angstroms region to discover the H-bond interaction with active site residue of FAK [27].

PLAN OF WORK

  1. Case study
  2. Science involved in disease target identification
  3. Virtual screening
  4. In-silico generation of ligands
  5. Protein optimization & energy minimization
  6. Molecular Docking
  7. Selection of potent inhibitors on the basis of binding energies and Lipinski’s Rule of 5
  8. Look for H-bond between ligand and active site of the residue of protein.
  9. Analysis and Evaluation
  10. ADMET Study

SOFTWARE

  • ChemSketch
  • Open Babel
  • SPDV
  • MGL Tools
  • Cygwin
  • UCSF Chimera
  • Online software for prediction of Molecular Properties.
  • Online software for prediction of Bioactivity.
  • Online software for Drug Likeness.
  • Online software for Bioavailability & ADME.
  • Online software for Toxicity.

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

A literature survey done by referring chemical abstracts, journals, etc. Further the reference work was carried out at BDG LifeSciences (OPC) Pvt. Ltd., India.

REFERENCES

  1. Structures of the Cancer-Related Aurora-A, FAK, and EphA2 Protein Kinases from Nanovolume Crystallography.  Jacek Nowakowski,1,3 Ciara´ n N. Cronin,1 Duncan E. McRee,1 Mark W. Knuth,1 Christian G. Nelson,1 Nikola P. Pavletich,2 Joe Rogers,1 Bi-Ching Sang,1 Daniel N. Scheibe,1 Ronald V. Swanson,1 and Devon A. Thompson1 1Syrrx, Inc. Structure, Vol. 10, 1659–1667, December, 2002
  2. Cohen, P. (2002). Protein kinases—the major drug targets of the twenty-first century. Nat. Rev. Drug Discov. 1, 309–315.
  3. Blume-Jensen, P., and Hunter, T. (2001). Oncogenic kinase signalling. Nature 411, 355–365.
  4. Discovery of Novel Focal Adhesion Kinase Inhibitors, Fengbo Wu 1,†, Ting Xu 1,†, Gu He 1,*, Liang Ouyang 1, Bo Han 2, Cheng Peng 2,* Xiangrong Song 1 and Mingli Xiang 1, Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13, 15668-15678; doi:10.3390.
  5. Schwartz, M.A.; Ginsberg, M.H. Networks and cross-talk: Integrin signaling spreads. Nat. Cell Biol. 2002, 4, E65–E68.
  6. Schlaepfer, D.D.; Hunter, T. Signal transduction from the extracellular matrix: Role for the focal adhesion protein-tyrosine kinase FAK. Cell Struct. Funct. 1996, 21, 445–450.
  7. Schlaepfer, D.D.; Hauck, C.R.; Sieg, D.J. Signaling through focal adhesion kinase. Prog. Biophys.Mol. Biol. 1999, 71, 435–478.
  8. Gabarra-Niecko, V.; Schaller, M.D.; Unty, J.M. FAK regulates biological processes important for the pathogenesis of cancer. Cancer Metastasis Rev. 2003, 22, 359–374.
  9. McLean, G.W.; Carragher, N.O.; Avizienyte, E.; Evans, J.; Brunton, V.G.; Frame, M.C. The role of focal adhesion kinase in cancer, new therapeutic opportunity. Nat. Rev. Cancer 2005, 5, 505–515.
  10. Sood, A.K.; Coffin, J.E.; Schneider, G.B.; DeYoung, B.R.; Gruman, L.M.; Gershenson, D.M.;Schaller, M.D.; Hendrix, M.J.C. Biological significance of focal adhesion kinase in ovarian cancer: role in migration and invasion. Am. J. Pathol. 2004, 165, 1087–1095.
  11. Cance, W.G.; Harris, J.E.; Iacocca, M.V.; Roche, E.; Yang, X.H.; Chang, J.L.; Simkins, S.; Xu, L.H. Immunohistochemical analyses of focal adhesion kinase expression in benign and malignant human breast and colon tissues: Correlation with preinvasive and invasive phenotypes. Clin. Cancer Res. 2000, 6, 2417–2423.
  12. Weiner, T.M.; Liu, E.T.; Craven, R.J.; Cance, W.G. Expression of focal adhesion kinase gene and invasive cancer. Lancet 1993, 342, 1024–1025.
  13. Jones, G.; Machado, J.; Tolnay, M.; Merlo, A. PTEN-independent induction of caspase-mediated cell death and reduced invasion by the focal adhesion targeting domain (FAT) in human astrocytic brain tumors which highly express focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Cancer Res. 2001, 61, 5688–5691.
  14. Golubovskaya, V.M.; Cance, W.G. Focal Adhesion Kinase and p53 Signaling in Cancer Cells. Int. Rev. Cytol. 2007, 263, 103–153.
  15. Crystal structures of the FAK kinase in complex with TAE226 and related bis-anilino pyrimidine inhibitors reveal a helical DFG conformation. Lietha, D.,  Eck, M.J.(2008) Plos One 3: E3800
  16. ACD/ChemSketch, version 12.01, Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada, www.acdlabs.com, 2014.
  17. Open Babel: An open chemical toolbox, Noel M O'Boyle1, Michael Banck2, Craig A James3, Chris Morley4, Tim Vandermeersch4 and Geoffrey R Hutchison5*, J. Cheminf. 2011, 3:33
  18. Swiss-PdbViewer, DeepView, Nicolas Guex , Alexandre Diemand , Manuel C. Peitsch , & Torsten Schwede
  19. Lengauer T, Rarey M (1996). "Computational methods for biomolecular docking". Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 6 (3): 402–6.
  20. Kitchen DB, Decornez H, Furr JR, Bajorath J (2004). "Docking and scoring in virtual screening for drug discovery: methods and applications". Nature reviews. Drug discovery 3 (11): 935–49.
  21. Jorgensen WL (1991). "Rusting of the lock and key model for protein-ligand binding". Science 254 (5034): 954–5.
  22. Wei BQ, Weaver LH, Ferrari AM, Matthews BW, Shoichet BK (2004). "Testing a flexible-receptor docking algorithm in a model binding site". J. Mol. Biol. 337 (5): 1161–82.
  23. Meng EC, Shoichet BK, Kuntz ID (2004). "Automated docking with grid-based energy evaluation". Journal of Computational Chemistry 13 (4): 505–524.
  24. Morris, G M. et al. (1998) Automated docking using a Lamarckian genetic algorithm and empirical binding free energy function. J. Comp Chem. 19, 1639-1662.
  25. Feig M, Onufriev A, Lee MS, Im W, Case DA, Brooks CL (2004). "Performance comparison of generalized born and Poisson methods in the calculation of electrostatic solvation energies for protein structures". Journal of Computational Chemistry 25 (2): 265–84.
  26. Morris GM, Goodsell DS, Halliday RS, Huey R, Hart WE, Belew RK, Olson AJ (1998). "Automated docking using a Lamarckian genetic algorithm and an empirical binding free energy function". Journal of Computational Chemistry 19 (14): 1639–1662.
  27. UCSF Chimera--a visualization system for exploratory research and analysis. Pettersen EF, Goddard TD, Huang CC, Couch GS, Greenblatt DM, Meng EC, Ferrin TE. J Comput Chem. 2004 Oct;25(13):1605-12.
WHAT YOU GET
  • Training in Bioinformatics & Drug Designing. Practical application of training.
  • Software, which you can use for other projects.
  • Tutorial and Papers of technology. So to make you understand every aspect of the technology.
  • Certificate of Internship.
  • Recommendation letter for Job/PhD.
  • Add the position of Intern in your CV and LinkedIn profile. This will serve the purpose of work experience.
  • We will connect you with people in our group who did projects with us which will help you in getting jobs as well as PhD positions around the world.

T & C

  • Only Windows OS is required for training & software installation.
  • Once you register and pay the fee we will send you a welcome email having details to prepare your system and installation of the software. Information of molecules (dataset of molecules) on which you have to work. Files and papers of technology as well as of project.
  • Once registration is done it is NON-REFUNDABLE/NON TRANSFERABLE.
  • Once you prepare your system and tell us when to conduct your training session and do not turn up then we will send you the steps of that phase.
  • The certificate will be given only when you complete all the tasks of the project, which means 5 phases.
  • While you will be working on the project and completing the tasks to monitor the progress of your work you have to send daily project reports to your guide.
  • You will be directly connected to your guide as well as in a group where people who have completed their research project with us are present to solve your queries at the earliest.

TEAM FOR CURRENT/ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS

72. Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking study of derivatives of chromen-2-one as selective Estrogen Receptor beta Agonists (SERBAs): Molecular Modeling study of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

  1. Keerthi Renganathan, School of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, D.Y. Patil University, India
  2. Nikita Mundhara, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, India.
  3. Tanveen Kaur Soni, JIS University, Agarpara, Kolkata, India.
  4. Sakshi Pandey, Banaras Hindu University, India.

71. Molecular Modeling Study of extracts of medicinal plants as potential anti-tubercular agents

  1. Titiksha Sharma, Delhi Technological University, Delhi, India.
  2. Jhancy Raj, Biogenix Research Centre, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India.
  3. Awadhesh Kumar Verma, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India.
  4. Shaniya Ali, Mar Athanasios College for Advance Studies Thiruvalla, Thiruvalla, Kerala, India.

70. Virtual screening & Molecular Docking of DOT1L & derivatives of Pinometostat | Molecular Modeling study of Therapeutic Target in Mixed-lineage Leukemia (MLL)

  1. Lakshmi Prasannah, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Bengaluru, India.
  2. Komal Kumari Gohil, K.J. Somaiya College of Science & Commerce, Mumbai,India.
  3. Yannick Luther Agbana, Pan African University Life and Earth Sciences Institute, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.
  4. Palak Shrivastava, Department of Biotechnology, Dr. Harisingh Gour University, Sagar, India.

69. Targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in cancer by molecular modeling study of Ganoderiol F and Beta- Catenin

  1. Mithra M S, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, India.
  2. Nikhil K Gigi, The Institute of Science, Dr. Homi Bhabha State University, Mumbai.
  3. Madhumita Ghosh, Ballygunge Science College, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
  4. Raktim Chowdhury, University of Mumbai, India.
  5. Zehratul Quresh, Metropolis Healthcare, Hyderabad, India.

68. Biomarker discovery based on omics technology

  1. Bansari Modi, Department of Botany , Bioinformatics, Climate change and impact management, School of Science, Gujarat University, India.
  2. Nishant Joshi, Shiva Nadar University, India.

67. Study of SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) and derivatives of Norterihanin to investigate potential inhibitors using Virtual Screening & Molecular Docking

  1. Satabdi Mohanty, Department of Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering, SRM University, India.
  2. Dhriti Gaur, Department of Biotechnology , Bennett University, India.
  3. Aditya G Lavekar, PI Industries, Rajasthan, India.

66. Molecular Modelling study of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein of COVID-19 with derivatives of Saikosaponins | Examining the anticoronaviral activity of saikosaponins (A, B2, C and D)

  1. Amisha Garg, System Biology and Bioinformatics, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India. 
  2. Sweta Mohanty, Department of Biotechnology, KIIT University, India.
  3. Rudra Prasad Nayak, Department of Biotechnology, KIIT University, India.
  4. Suparna Giri, Department of Biotechnology, KIIT University, India.
  5. Aakash Deva T.P, School of Bioengineering, SRMIST, Chennai, India.

65. Molecular Modeling study of Southeast Asian Medicinal Plant Aglaia erythrosperma  and α-D-glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase (Mycobacterium-RmlA) | Discovery of new drugs for multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mtb

  1. Arka Sanyal, Department of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneshwar, Odisha, India.
  2. Ankita Mohanty, Department of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneshwar, Odisha, India
  3. Saswat Dash, Department of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneshwar, Odisha, India
  4. Aditi Rubal, Department of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneshwar, Odisha, India
  5. Anusakha Panigrahi, Department of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneshwar, Odisha, India
  6. Adrija Dihingia, Department of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneshwar, Odisha, India

64.Molecular Modeling study of Cyclophilin A and derivatives of 1,8-Diamino-2,4,5,7-tetrachloroanthraquinone: Design of novel inhibitors for Cyclophilin A 

  1. Safiya Aafreen, Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University , Baltimore, USA.
  2. Jyothi Giridhar, Narayana Pharmacy College, JNTU Anantapur, India.
  3. Sanica Nadkarni, MGM Institute of Health Sciences, India.
  4. Ankita Saha, Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee(IITR), Roorkee, Uttarakhand, India.
  5. Nirav Parmar, Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee(IITR), Roorkee, Uttarakhand, India.
  6. Manjari Gaur, Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee(IITR), Roorkee, Uttarakhand, India.

63. Molecular Modelling study of Catalytic domain of protein kinase PknB from Mycobacterium tuberculosis | Discovery of new Anti-Tubercular Drugs

  1. P Ansuman Abhisek, MKCGMCH, Odisha, India.
  2. Chitra Roy, Ballygunge Science College, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India.
  3. Ramya Vishwanathan, Biotechnology Engineering, SRM Institute Of Science And Technology, India.
  4. Niyati Bisht, Department of Immunology and Virology, Amity University, Noida, India.
  5. Mudita Appasaheb Kadam, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. 

62. Molecular Modelling study of p53-MDM2 | Discovery of new Anti-CANCER Drugs by Molecular Docking & MD Simulations Approach

  1. Ngoc Pham, The Applied Chemistry Department of the International University, Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam.
  2. Remya Prajeshgopal, Virology Department, Emirates Modern Poultry Co(Al Rawdah), Dubai, UAE.
  3. Shibam Dey, B.Tech+ M. Tech Biotechnology Dual Degree, KIIT University Bhubaneshwar,Odhisa, India
  4. Shalini Susmita, B.Tech+ M. Tech Biotechnology Dual Degree, KIIT University Bhubaneshwar,Odhisa, India.
  5. Anurag Chatterjee, B.Tech+ M. Tech Biotechnology Dual Degree, KIIT University Bhubaneshwar,Odhisa, India.

61. Molecular modeling of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1(S1P1) as target for multiple sclerosis | A Virtual screening, Molecular docking & ADMET study

  1. Veera Raghava Choudary Palacharla, Scientist, Drug Discovery, M.Pharmacy, Annamalai University, India.
  2. Dr Arul Amuthan, Division of Siddha, Center for Integrative Medicine and Research (CIMR), Manipal University, India.
  3. Sandip Jaiswal, Operations manager (Cloud Platform), CSC, India.
  4. Manika Gupta, Master of Science in Genomics, Amity Institute of Virology and Immunology, Amity University, India.
  5. Dhanush R A, B. Tech - Genetic engineering, SRM Institute of Science and Technology, India.
  6. Poonam Dhiman, BS-MS Integrated Course, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali, India.
  7. Preethi Varriar, Bachelor of Technology (B. Tech), Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, India
  8. Mohammad Khan, Masters of Science in Bioinformatics, G.N Khalsa College, Matunga, Mumbai, India
  9. Shagufta Khan, Masters of Science in Bioinformatics, G.N Khalsa College, Matunga, Mumbai, India.

60. Inhibitory study of α-D-glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase (Mycobacterium-RmlA) | Discovery of new drugs for multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mtb

  1. Prof. Dr. Ali Abdulhafidh Ibrahim Al-Shaikhli, Department of Mathematical and applied computer, College of Science, Al-Nahrain University, Jadriyah, Baghdad, Iraq.
  2. Dr. Prince Prashant Sharma,Gurukula Kangri Vishwavidyalaya, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Haridwar, India.
  3. Gauri Kiran Vanjari, Bachelor of Dental Surgery, SASS Yogita Dental College and Hospital, Maharashtra University of health Sciences, Nasik, India.
  4. Shivam Bhan, B.Tech Biotechnology, Amity University, Noida, UP, India.

59. Molecular modeling study of derivatives of dutasteride and Human Steroid 5β-Reductase (AKR1D1) | Discovery of new drugs for prostate cancer

  1. Chhavi Rai, BDG LifeSciences, India.
  2. Vinay Kumar, BDG LifeSciences, India
  3. Dipjyoti Dey, Master of Science Applied Microbiology, Vellore Institute of Technology (VIT) University, Vellore, India.
  4. Mehuli Mishra, B.Sc, Department of Biotechnology, Jyoti Nivas College, Bengaluru, India
  5. Vidushi Aggarwal, B.Sc, Department of Biotechnology, Jyoti Nivas College, Bengaluru, India.
  6. Disha Mitra, Biophysics, Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics, Rajabazar Science College, Calcutta University, India.
  7. Suparna Maji, B.Tech M.Tech Dual Degree in Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
  8. Soumyadipta Das, B.Tech M.Tech Dual Degree in Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
  9. Suman Nayek, B.Tech M.Tech Dual Degree in Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.
  10. Subarna Chakraborty, B. Tech Genetic Engineering, SRM Institute of Science and Technology, India.

57. Molecular modeling study of α-glucosidase Inhibitors (AGIs) | Discovery of new anti-diabetic drugs by controlling postprandial hyperglycemia

  1. Dr Minakshi Garg PhD, Assistant Professor in Biotechnology, University Institute of Engineering and Technology, Panjab University Chandigarh, India
  2. M. Raghanivedha, Master of science in Biotechnology, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.
  3. Shreya Mondal, B. Tech (Biotechnology), Amity University, Noida, India.
  4. H. Vijayasri, B.Sc. (Hons) Biomedical Sciences at Sri Ramachandra Institute of Higher Education and Research (DU) Porur, Chennai.
  5. Nikita Yadav, BS-MS Integrated Course, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali, India
  6. Sucharita Ghosh, B.Tech M.Tech Dual Degree in Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.

56. Discovery of new ligands for PPAR Gamma responsible for Diabetes Type 2: A Virtual Screening, Docking & ADMET Study.

  1. Bharti Mittal, PhD, Senior Scientist, Operations, MedGenome Labs Pvt Ltd, Bangalore, India.
  2. Vivek Srivastava, Ph.D., Assistant Professor(Biochemistry), School of Basic Sciences and Research, Sharda University, Greater Noida, UP
  3. Maitili Varma, Advanced Proficiency course in Genetic engineering, Genohelix Biolabs, Jain Group of Institutions, India.
  4. Priyadarshini Sharma, B. Tech, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, Noida, India.
  5. Harshita Agarwal, B. Sc, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, Noida , India.
  6. Gupta Radha Devi Shivprakash, Masters of Science in Bioinformatics, G.N Khalsa College, Matunga, Mumbai, India
  7. Raisa Dabhilkar, Masters of Science in Bioinformatics, G.N Khalsa College, Matunga, Mumbai, India.

53. Molecular Modelling study of phytoconstituents from medicinal plants of India | Discovery of natural anti-tubercular agents

  1. Taiba Hamed Youssef Gamal El Din, Master in Biotechnology & Life Science, Bani Sueif University, Bani Sueif, Egypt.
  2. Syeda Birjees Misbah, M.Sc., Biochemistry, REVA University, Bangalore, India.
  3. Aindrila Pal, B. Tech, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, Noida, India.
  4. Preeti, M.Sc Biotech, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, India.
  5. Ngoc Pham, The Applied Chemistry Department of the International University, Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam.
  6. Moumita Ganguly, Research Associate, IIT Mandi, India.
  7. Deeksha Gairola, M.Sc Biotech, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, India.
  8. Ketaki Ghatole, B.E. Biotechnology, MS Ramaiah Institute of Technology, Bengaluru, India.

49. Molecular Modeling study of Zika Virus | Virtual Screening, Protein Modeling, Docking, ADMET and MD Simulations Study

  1. Dr. Alam El-Din, Hanaa Mahmoud, Virology and Immnunology Unit, Cancer Biology Department, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.
  2. Manjisa Choudhury, VIT University, Vellore, India.
  3. Nada Gamal Ibrahim El-Dawy, Faculty of Biotechnology, October University for Modern Sciences and Arts, Egypt (MSA University).

39. Study of derivatives of Chalcones as new Tyrosinase inhibitors: A Molecular Docking, ADME & Tox Study

  1. Adwaita Das, Department of Botany, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan, West Bengal, India
  2. Shreya John MSc Bioinformatics, St. Aloysius Institute of Management and Technology, Mangalore University.
  3. Lalit R. Samant, Project Assistant, Haffkine Institute for Training Research and Testing, India.
  4. K.C. Haritah Yadav, M. Sc (Medical Pharmacology) from Kamineni Institute of Medical Sciences, Narkrtpally, Nalgonda, Andhra Pradesh.
  5. Dr. N. Hari, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu.
  6. Dr(Mrs) Jhaumeer Laulloo Sabina, University of Mauritius, Reduit, Mauritius.

34. Study of extracts of Veratrum Dahuricum as potential Anti-tumor molecules: Molecular Docking & Modeling study with Farnesyl Pyrophosphate Synthase (FFPS)

  1. Gomathi Rajendran, ITC Zenith (M) Sdn. Bhd. (Conformity Assessment Body), Malaysia.
  2. Seetha Harilal, Department of Pharmacology, Nehru College of Pharmacy, Kerala University of Health Sciences, Thrissur, Kerala, India.
  3. Akshya Kumar Mailapali, I. M.Sc Bioinformatics , B.J.B. Autonomous College, Utkal University, Bhubaneshwar, India.
  4. Tanya Munjal, M.Sc Biotech, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, India.
  5. Sambit Kumar Roy, M.Sc Biotech, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, India.
  6. Lucky Gupta, M.Sc Biotech, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, India.
  7. Gaurav Dutt, School of Basic and Applied Science, Dayananda Sagar University, Bangalore, India.